How To Grow Corn In A Raised Bed Garden

You Can Grow Corn In A Raised Bed Garden

You can grow corn in many different ways, because there are so many different variations on how to grow vegetable crops in your garden. Onegrow corn normally doesn’t think about growing corn in a raised bed, but there’s no reason that you can’t grow corn by that method. If your space or soil conditions aren’t ideal, you can always modify them to suit your needs to grow corn, and raised bed gardening is one very simple way to do it. Going to a raised bed garden to grow corn gives you a great deal of control over your soil composition as well. Corn is what’s known as a heavy feeder which means that it needs a lot of nitrogen in the soil. Amending your soil with compost and blood meal gives you a very organic way to grow corn.

Use The Correct Spacing

If you decide to grow corn in a raised bed vegetable garden, have at least two rows next to each other and place them each about ten feet long so that your corn plants can efficiently pollinate each other via the wind. Place a single corn seed about an inch into the soil and 8-10 inches in from the edge of the raised bed, while keeping about one foot of space minimum between adjacent plantings. This will give your plants enough room to spread out as they grow. This is what you can do when space is at a premium, otherwise you could spread them out to between 1 to 3 feet between each plant if you were in an open field and planting them into the ground.

Use Enough Water and Fertilizer to Grow Corn in a Raised Bed

Water your seeds in very well and keep the soil moist but never wet over the succeeding weeks. Adding in some nitrogen from blood meal every two weeks will keep your corn plants properly nourished. Planting later in the season will help you avoid many common insect pests. Just make sure that if you plant 90-day corn (30 days to germinate plus 60 days to reach maturity) you can count on being able to harvest before the first frost of the fall season. Now that you’re armed with this knowledge, once you taste the sweetness of what you’ve harvested you’ll definitely want to grow corn again next season.

 

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About Mike Eis

Physician, Author, Marketer, Scientist, Problem Solver, Carpenter and Armchair Philosopher