Best Tips For Fall Vegetable Gardening

Well, here we are again, time to talk about fall vegetable gardening. I ran across this short article by Danielle Carroll writing for the Anniston Star that has some really good tips and tricks to get some more life out of your late summer garden.

Best Tips For Fall Vegetable Gardening

As hot as it is, it seems pretty silly to start thinking about cool season vegetables right now. But guess what? It’s time!

fall vegetable gardening

Fall vegetable gardening extends the productivity of your garden.

Just a couple of weekends ago, I started a second planting of tomatoes. Last weekend, it was squash and beans for a fall harvest. This weekend, I’m making room for some of the “other,” oft-forgotten vegetables. I’m thinking broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, carrots, turnips, spinach and a few more.

These cool-season veggies are grown a lot in the spring. But depending on the weather, they will often grow and produce better in the fall.

A blast of quick, hot temperatures in the spring can bring cool-season vegetables to a screaming halt. When those hot temperatures come in early and decide to stay, vegetable plants like turnips and cauliflower will bolt. “Bolting” is when the plant starts sending up flowers and going to seed; the plant can also become woody and unfit to eat.

When planted in the fall, however, there is plenty of time for harvesting before inclement weather. Last year, the mild winter meant year-round gardening, without having to offer protection for any plants. If you like collards, they are better with a little “frostbite.”

Read the entire post here at annistonstar.com:

Well, some more advice for fall vegetable gardening in your backyard plot. Go ahead and try something new and different to help extend the life of your vegetable garden. You’d be surprised at the amount of produce you can get out of it, probably right up to Thanksgiving.

Please share your thoughts and any late summer, early fall vegetable gardening experiences with us by leaving a comment below. You can also click on the like button to share this with a gardener friend.

Pray for peace and grace and spiritual food.  For wisdom and guidance, for all these are good. But don’t forget the potatoes.
                                                                                                                             —  John Tyler Pettee

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About Mike Eis

Physician, Author, Marketer, Scientist, Problem Solver, Carpenter and Armchair Philosopher